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Thread: Enforced loyalty in distant lands (BBC News)

  1. #1
    Uyghur News Guest

    Default Enforced loyalty in distant lands (BBC News)

    Enforced loyalty in distant lands
    By James Reynolds
    BBC News, Xinjiang province

    At dusk in the city of Kasghar, you can shoot your enemies one-by-one at one of the arcade games set up in the main square.

    The sun has gone down. Dozens of old men walk towards the Id Kah mosque just off the square.

    This is a Muslim city. The people who live here are Central Asian - they are known as Uighurs. They have their own language and culture.

    But China's ruling Communist Party is everywhere.

    It picks Kashgar's rulers, it sends in Chinese soldiers to patrol the nearby border with Afghanistan, and it even makes sure the city's clocks are set to Beijing time.

    The communists want the Uighur people to understand one thing - their province is an inseparable part of China.

    My colleague and I stop a couple of young women in the main square.

    "Where we're standing in Kashgar - is this China?" I ask.

    "Yes," they both reply quickly. And they say nothing more.

    Everybody else we ask gives the same answer. It is not surprising - speaking out against the Communist Party in China is dangerous.

    Al Qaeda links?

    But for years, some Uighurs have campaigned for an independent state which would be called East Turkestan - West Turkestan is the rest of Central Asia.

    A small group called the East Turkestan Islamic Movement has also been waging a low-level insurgency against the communist state.

    China insists the group has links to al-Qaeda. At the start of the year the Chinese army raided a base along the border and killed 18 militants and captured 17 more.

    Some of China's worries are written on the walls of Kasghar.

    On the side of one building near a main square, there is a sign written in red, in Chinese. It says: "The East Turkestan Islamic Movement is a terrorist group."

    Another sign next to it reads: "Organising your own group pilgrimage [to Mecca] is illegal."

    By the side of the road, my colleague and I start talking to a Uighur man selling cups of tea and bowls of mutton soup.

    We chat about life in Kashgar. Then I try a direct question.

    Our principle is clear - if there are separatists, we will get them
    "What do you think about the separatists?" I ask.

    My colleague translates the question. The two of them talk for several minutes.

    "He refuses to answer," says my colleague. "He says he doesn't know who we are."

    So we walk off.

    Religion suspicions

    Later on, we join a tour of the Id Kah mosque.

    A jumpy Chinese government guide tells us not to disturb the Muslims at prayer.

    A local Uighur guide tries to explain the Communist Party's ban on unofficial group pilgrimages to Mecca.

    "If you organise a group to go to Mecca by yourself, it's illegal because you're not taking care of the group's safety," he explains.

    "If they go to Mecca they might be trampled or killed by other people because there are too many people inside the mosque."

    But there is another reason for the ban. The Communist Party does not want young Uighur men getting together where they cannot be controlled.

    The Communist Party is suspicious of the power of religion.

    And there is something strange about Kashgar - it is a Muslim city, but there are no loud calls to prayer.

    A government official assures us that we have simply not been listening properly, and that the evening call to prayer from the Id Kah mosque will soon be heard loud and clear.

    But the minutes go by. Then the official explains that the call to prayer will not happen because the loudspeaker at the mosque has just broken.

    China prefers less threatening sounds. So, a trade fair in the provincial capital of Urumqi is opened with a burst of non-religious, non-political folk music.

    Inside the main building, Communist Party chiefs - officials, soldiers and bodyguards - wander through the exhibits.

    Nurlan Abdumajin, a deputy governor of Xinjiang, says: "Our principle is clear - if there are separatists, we will get them. No matter how many of them there are.

    "The unity of China is our responsibility. That's what the people want. This province is very secure now."

    And China wants it to stay that way.

    In this communist state there is no room for any separatists - and no room for anyone to be loyal to anything other than the Communist Party.

    This article is part of a week of special coverage on how China is ruled.
    Story from BBC NEWS:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/h...ic/7050728.stm

    Published: 2007/10/18 16:59:06 GMT

    © BBC MMVII

  2. #2
    Unregistered Guest

    Thumbs up we make more fuss and things move more faster

    Quote Originally Posted by Uyghur News View Post
    Enforced loyalty in distant lands
    By James Reynolds
    BBC News, Xinjiang province

    At dusk in the city of Kasghar, you can shoot your enemies one-by-one at one of the arcade games set up in the main square.

    The sun has gone down. Dozens of old men walk towards the Id Kah mosque just off the square.

    This is a Muslim city. The people who live here are Central Asian - they are known as Uighurs. They have their own language and culture.

    But China's ruling Communist Party is everywhere.

    It picks Kashgar's rulers, it sends in Chinese soldiers to patrol the nearby border with Afghanistan, and it even makes sure the city's clocks are set to Beijing time.

    The communists want the Uighur people to understand one thing - their province is an inseparable part of China.

    My colleague and I stop a couple of young women in the main square.

    "Where we're standing in Kashgar - is this China?" I ask.

    "Yes," they both reply quickly. And they say nothing more.

    Everybody else we ask gives the same answer. It is not surprising - speaking out against the Communist Party in China is dangerous.

    Al Qaeda links?

    But for years, some Uighurs have campaigned for an independent state which would be called East Turkestan - West Turkestan is the rest of Central Asia.

    A small group called the East Turkestan Islamic Movement has also been waging a low-level insurgency against the communist state.

    China insists the group has links to al-Qaeda. At the start of the year the Chinese army raided a base along the border and killed 18 militants and captured 17 more.

    Some of China's worries are written on the walls of Kasghar.

    On the side of one building near a main square, there is a sign written in red, in Chinese. It says: "The East Turkestan Islamic Movement is a terrorist group."

    Another sign next to it reads: "Organising your own group pilgrimage [to Mecca] is illegal."

    By the side of the road, my colleague and I start talking to a Uighur man selling cups of tea and bowls of mutton soup.

    We chat about life in Kashgar. Then I try a direct question.

    Our principle is clear - if there are separatists, we will get them
    "What do you think about the separatists?" I ask.

    My colleague translates the question. The two of them talk for several minutes.

    "He refuses to answer," says my colleague. "He says he doesn't know who we are."

    So we walk off.

    Religion suspicions

    Later on, we join a tour of the Id Kah mosque.

    A jumpy Chinese government guide tells us not to disturb the Muslims at prayer.

    A local Uighur guide tries to explain the Communist Party's ban on unofficial group pilgrimages to Mecca.

    "If you organise a group to go to Mecca by yourself, it's illegal because you're not taking care of the group's safety," he explains.

    "If they go to Mecca they might be trampled or killed by other people because there are too many people inside the mosque."

    But there is another reason for the ban. The Communist Party does not want young Uighur men getting together where they cannot be controlled.

    The Communist Party is suspicious of the power of religion.

    And there is something strange about Kashgar - it is a Muslim city, but there are no loud calls to prayer.

    A government official assures us that we have simply not been listening properly, and that the evening call to prayer from the Id Kah mosque will soon be heard loud and clear.

    But the minutes go by. Then the official explains that the call to prayer will not happen because the loudspeaker at the mosque has just broken.

    China prefers less threatening sounds. So, a trade fair in the provincial capital of Urumqi is opened with a burst of non-religious, non-political folk music.

    Inside the main building, Communist Party chiefs - officials, soldiers and bodyguards - wander through the exhibits.

    Nurlan Abdumajin, a deputy governor of Xinjiang, says: "Our principle is clear - if there are separatists, we will get them. No matter how many of them there are.

    "The unity of China is our responsibility. That's what the people want. This province is very secure now."

    And China wants it to stay that way.

    In this communist state there is no room for any separatists - and no room for anyone to be loyal to anything other than the Communist Party.

    This article is part of a week of special coverage on how China is ruled.
    Story from BBC NEWS:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/h...ic/7050728.stm

    Published: 2007/10/18 16:59:06 GMT

    ? BBC MMVII

    thsnks for the post,and your time :-)

  3. #3
    Kevin Guest

    Default Re-we make more fuss and things move more faster

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    thsnks for the post,and your time :-)
    "we make more fuss and things move more faster".
    This must be the title of the year I guess.

  4. #4
    Unregistered Guest

    Default hahahaha i am just a nobody

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin View Post
    "we make more fuss and things move more faster".
    This must be the title of the year I guess.
    i dont make decisions you idiot...still the same words to you.... find some humanity in yourself man... why are u so upset about it anyway??????? havent the free world changed you in a bit???? how long have you been living in the west dude???????
    it seems to me like you with your chuck buddy will soon join us to fight the evil commos lol

  5. #5
    Kevin Guest

    Default Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    i dont make decisions you idiot...still the same words to you.... find some humanity in yourself man... why are u so upset about it anyway??????? havent the free world changed you in a bit???? how long have you been living in the west dude???????
    it seems to me like you with your chuck buddy will soon join us to fight the evil commos lol
    There is something called critical thinking in the west, other than liberal media mass conditioning.

    Dalai Lama has already given up on independence. He knew that Tibet is both weak in economy and military with a small population. He is seeking for high degree of autonomous control by the natives.
    But you guys find to creat a Uyghur supremacist nation. You want to chase or pressurise the majority of Han Chinese to be out of Xinjiang. You guys want to claim territories that are Mongel or Uzbek majority.

    Most importantly, the referendum you people support exclude Non-Uyghurs, exclude tax paying and law abding citizens on the basis of colour.

    You should realise the world's difference in attitude towards you guys and Dalai Lama.

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