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Unregistered
11-09-06, 19:08
Pope Bendict, Huseyin Celil, and the Dalia Lama



Three disparate people flickered across the Canadian radar screen in the past few days. They are proof of the old line about 6 degrees of separation.
Pope Benedict held a conference with his regional cardinals who exercise spiritual responsibility for Canada last week. The Pope apparently expressed his dismay at the secularising of Canadian politics. His Holiness was critical of Roman Catholic politicians who did not vote with their Catholic conscience on issues such as same sex marriage.
The mainstream media uttered its predictable bleating about the Pope sticking his oar in our domestic politics. The consensus was that politics and morality were separate issues, and the Bishop of Rome had no right to comment upon how our elected House of Commons conducted its business. “Interference” was a common noun used in the reports.
The same media expressed concerns over the perceived slights directed at the Chinese diplomatic corp in Ottawa in recent weeks. The Globe and Mail in particular advanced the view that Canada’s failure to engage the Chinese in formal meetings was both a breach of diplomatic protocol and a possible slight that would compromise all efforts by Canadian business to stake its claim to a piece of the buoyant and ever expanding Chinese economy .
In a companion commentary, the extension of honorary citizenship by Canada in June of this year to the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibet exiled for almost 40 years, was also characterized as an affront to China. The Chinese, who annexed Tibet in a less than friendly invasion in 1950 and who have clearly practiced various forms of ethnic repression of the Tibetan people ever since, are reportedly unhappy with Canada’s creation of this honorific, previously extended only to Nelson Mandela and Raoul Wallenburg. The Chinese see the Dalai Lama as a terrorist and a fomentor of insurrection. Fears were expressed in our media as to how this act would also impair Canadian business opportunities in China.
As these potential commercial repurcussions were considered by the press, it was reported that Huseyin Celil had been sentenced to a 15 year stretch in an undoubtedly cheerful Chinese prison for his role in the alleged murder of a Chinese government official in 2000. The Chinese have refused all Canadian diplomatic efforts to speak with Celil since he was arrested in March of this year, on the basis that he was a terrorist, full stop. If he has been tried, it was in secret. His family have been denied any access to him. Celil is being held at an undisclosed location. Other than one tepid discusison between our Foreign Minister and the Chinese officials in Ottawa in July, no high level effort has been made to secure the complete story regarding Celil, or what future plans the Chinese may have for him. Given China’s general treatment of Moslems in general and the Uighur people in particular (Celil is both), one wonders how he will survive a 15 year sentence.
Celil is a Canadian citizen, a national of a country where the rule of law is supreme. Are we so afraid of interfering in the stream of Chinese commerce that we would treat Celil and his family so disgracefully?
The spiritual leader of millions of Roman Catholic Canadians simply comments about our secular politics and he is roundly criticized in our national press.
A Canadian citizen is imprisoned in China, without a public trial and he is exposed to all manner of deprivations, and it remains business as usual with the wonderful people in Beijing.
I am ashamed to hold my passport.



ZASwonderwords
Bryan Davies, Director
Whitby, Ontario
Canada
(905) 409 8557
http://zas1.wordpress.com/

Unregistered
14-09-06, 07:03
Pope Bendict, Huseyin Celil, and the Dalia Lama



Three disparate people flickered across the Canadian radar screen in the past few days. They are proof of the old line about 6 degrees of separation.
Pope Benedict held a conference with his regional cardinals who exercise spiritual responsibility for Canada last week. The Pope apparently expressed his dismay at the secularising of Canadian politics. His Holiness was critical of Roman Catholic politicians who did not vote with their Catholic conscience on issues such as same sex marriage.
The mainstream media uttered its predictable bleating about the Pope sticking his oar in our domestic politics. The consensus was that politics and morality were separate issues, and the Bishop of Rome had no right to comment upon how our elected House of Commons conducted its business. “Interference” was a common noun used in the reports.
The same media expressed concerns over the perceived slights directed at the Chinese diplomatic corp in Ottawa in recent weeks. The Globe and Mail in particular advanced the view that Canada’s failure to engage the Chinese in formal meetings was both a breach of diplomatic protocol and a possible slight that would compromise all efforts by Canadian business to stake its claim to a piece of the buoyant and ever expanding Chinese economy .
In a companion commentary, the extension of honorary citizenship by Canada in June of this year to the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibet exiled for almost 40 years, was also characterized as an affront to China. The Chinese, who annexed Tibet in a less than friendly invasion in 1950 and who have clearly practiced various forms of ethnic repression of the Tibetan people ever since, are reportedly unhappy with Canada’s creation of this honorific, previously extended only to Nelson Mandela and Raoul Wallenburg. The Chinese see the Dalai Lama as a terrorist and a fomentor of insurrection. Fears were expressed in our media as to how this act would also impair Canadian business opportunities in China.
As these potential commercial repurcussions were considered by the press, it was reported that Huseyin Celil had been sentenced to a 15 year stretch in an undoubtedly cheerful Chinese prison for his role in the alleged murder of a Chinese government official in 2000. The Chinese have refused all Canadian diplomatic efforts to speak with Celil since he was arrested in March of this year, on the basis that he was a terrorist, full stop. If he has been tried, it was in secret. His family have been denied any access to him. Celil is being held at an undisclosed location. Other than one tepid discusison between our Foreign Minister and the Chinese officials in Ottawa in July, no high level effort has been made to secure the complete story regarding Celil, or what future plans the Chinese may have for him. Given China’s general treatment of Moslems in general and the Uighur people in particular (Celil is both), one wonders how he will survive a 15 year sentence.
Celil is a Canadian citizen, a national of a country where the rule of law is supreme. Are we so afraid of interfering in the stream of Chinese commerce that we would treat Celil and his family so disgracefully?
The spiritual leader of millions of Roman Catholic Canadians simply comments about our secular politics and he is roundly criticized in our national press.
A Canadian citizen is imprisoned in China, without a public trial and he is exposed to all manner of deprivations, and it remains business as usual with the wonderful people in Beijing.
I am ashamed to hold my passport.



ZASwonderwords
Bryan Davies, Director
Whitby, Ontario
Canada
(905) 409 8557
http://zas1.wordpress.com/


Thenks all about your help for Uyghur Peapole Mr.Bryan Davies!Thenks a lot!