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Tarim Yilpizi
13-03-06, 19:03
Blood pressure down - and it's not drugs



Average population blood pressure is falling in many countries but not because of drug treatments, says a new study.

Blood pressure levels - a key risk factor for coronary heart disease - are dropping in many industrialised countries, but it is not clear what's driving this fall. It could be due to drugs or other environmental or lifestyle factors such as diet.

So Professor Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe of the University of Dundee, UK, and colleagues analysed the available data. They pooled results from a World Health Organisation study of 38 populations in 21 countries, taken between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s.

They found that systolic blood pressure dropped by an average of 2.2 mmHg in men, and 3.3 mmHg in women. Diastolic blood pressure fell by 1.4 mmHg in men and 2.2 mm Hg in women.

Because there were falls in low and medium blood pressure readings as well as high readings, the researchers believe the trend is not due to drug treatment.

On the website of the British Medical Journal today (10 March), they write: "Antihypertensive medication made no detectable contribution to the population decline in blood pressure".

Other determinants of blood pressure must have been more powerful, they suggest, but they are unable to pinpoint these factors.

"These findings do not deny the importance of antihypertensive medication in the individual, but are important in understanding blood pressure as a challenge to public health," they conclude.

Unregistered
14-03-06, 15:13
I do need to down my blood pressure, thank you tarim yilpizi !








Blood pressure down - and it's not drugs



Average population blood pressure is falling in many countries but not because of drug treatments, says a new study.

Blood pressure levels - a key risk factor for coronary heart disease - are dropping in many industrialised countries, but it is not clear what's driving this fall. It could be due to drugs or other environmental or lifestyle factors such as diet.

So Professor Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe of the University of Dundee, UK, and colleagues analysed the available data. They pooled results from a World Health Organisation study of 38 populations in 21 countries, taken between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s.

They found that systolic blood pressure dropped by an average of 2.2 mmHg in men, and 3.3 mmHg in women. Diastolic blood pressure fell by 1.4 mmHg in men and 2.2 mm Hg in women.

Because there were falls in low and medium blood pressure readings as well as high readings, the researchers believe the trend is not due to drug treatment.

On the website of the British Medical Journal today (10 March), they write: "Antihypertensive medication made no detectable contribution to the population decline in blood pressure".

Other determinants of blood pressure must have been more powerful, they suggest, but they are unable to pinpoint these factors.

"These findings do not deny the importance of antihypertensive medication in the individual, but are important in understanding blood pressure as a challenge to public health," they conclude.

Unregistered
14-03-06, 15:14
most of uyghurs have high blood pressure, because of fascist communist chinese putting too much pressure to innocent uyghurs on daily life.








I do need to down my blood pressure, thank you tarim yilpizi !