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Unregistered
13-09-10, 12:12
“Ethnic Conflicts” or “Social Riots”? How to Understand Ethnic Relations in Xinjiang

Professor Yang Zhongdong talks about ethnic relations in Xinjiang.

09/23/2010 4:00PM - 6:00PM

USC Davidson Conference Center, California Room
Address: 3415 S. Figueroa, Los Angeles, CA 90007
Cost: Free
Phone: 1-213-821-4382
Website: http://china.usc.edu/ShowArticle.aspx?articleID=2005


Professor Yang Zhongdong, a visiting scholar from Xinjiang University’s School of Humanities, talks about recent ethnic riots in China's Xinjiang Autonomous Region. Professor Yang argues against the use of the concept of "ethnic conflict" to describe of the 2009 riots in Xinjiang. He combines a comprehensive analysis of the riots with particular attention to social, economic, cultural, and historical factors with recollections of his own personal experiences in Xinjiang.

Professor Yang's research focus is contemporary Muslim communities in Xinjiang Province. Born in Urumqi, the region’s capital, Professor Yang is a Hui, a Muslim ethnic minority. This background helped inspire his study of the history and the culture of Xinjiang. As a scholar in Hui Studies, a fairly new discipline, Professor Yang emphasizes the importance of the ethnological discipline in his research. Ethnology, according to Professor Yang, incorporates a large amount of fieldwork that is essential to studying one specific ethnicity. The diversity of China dictates that an ethnological approach to studying the Xinjiang people is indispensible. His current research in Los Angeles involves comparing how religion and ethnicity shape the identity of Muslim minorities in the U.S. and China.

Contact: US-China Institute
Phone: 1-213-821-4382
Email: uschina@usc.edu

Sponsor(s): US-China Institute

Unregistered
15-09-10, 10:19
“Ethnic Conflicts” or “Social Riots”? How to Understand Ethnic Relations in Xinjiang

Professor Yang Zhongdong talks about ethnic relations in Xinjiang.

09/23/2010 4:00PM - 6:00PM

USC Davidson Conference Center, California Room
Address: 3415 S. Figueroa, Los Angeles, CA 90007
Cost: Free
Phone: 1-213-821-4382
Website: http://china.usc.edu/ShowArticle.aspx?articleID=2005


Professor Yang Zhongdong, a visiting scholar from Xinjiang University’s School of Humanities, talks about recent ethnic riots in China's Xinjiang Autonomous Region. Professor Yang argues against the use of the concept of "ethnic conflict" to describe of the 2009 riots in Xinjiang. He combines a comprehensive analysis of the riots with particular attention to social, economic, cultural, and historical factors with recollections of his own personal experiences in Xinjiang.

Professor Yang's research focus is contemporary Muslim communities in Xinjiang Province. Born in Urumqi, the region’s capital, Professor Yang is a Hui, a Muslim ethnic minority. This background helped inspire his study of the history and the culture of Xinjiang. As a scholar in Hui Studies, a fairly new discipline, Professor Yang emphasizes the importance of the ethnological discipline in his research. Ethnology, according to Professor Yang, incorporates a large amount of fieldwork that is essential to studying one specific ethnicity. The diversity of China dictates that an ethnological approach to studying the Xinjiang people is indispensible. His current research in Los Angeles involves comparing how religion and ethnicity shape the identity of Muslim minorities in the U.S. and China.

Contact: US-China Institute
Phone: 1-213-821-4382
Email: uschina@usc.edu

Sponsor(s): US-China Institute

We write our own history and decide our own future!!!! as simple as that......we dont want to be slaves to the chinese people.......and we do not want to enslave no body. making us rich or whatsoever will not change the fact that we uyghurs are not chinese and will not be chinese forever.....we loath oppressors and crave for freedom......no matter what the chinese do to us (bad or good) one thing will never change,that is our determination to live as free peoplein in our own country just like the chinese people ......our country is not china and will never be china

Unregistered
18-09-10, 00:16
Uyghur need freedom as top of everything. Living under chinese control is one and the main one triggering conflict or roit. Chinese is the invader, so it is the right of uyghur fight aginst them as format of conflict or peaceful demonstartion/roit or worse. The chinese profrsesor who works for chinese govenment has a stamped way of thinking as chinese nationalism and trying to hind the chinese government/armies crime by address this question.