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Unregistered
11-11-09, 21:41
China Diary -Neha Sahay

They made headlines around the world, but the place most affected — Urumqi — learnt of the executions of nine persons for the July riots between the local Uighurs and the majority Han residents of the city by text messages on their mobiles. The messages were sent by the region’s information office.

Interestingly, the only mention of the executions in China’s official newspaper, the China Daily, was a small news item on Page Three titled “Execution news flies via text messages.” Neither the names of those executed nor the time or date of their execution was mentioned, either in the messages or in the news item.

The secrecy is indicative of the clampdown on information and communication in this Muslim-dominated province after the July riots. Since the disturbances, the distance between the Hans and the Uighurs seems to have grown, thanks largely to the mysterious syringe attacks that took place in September. Again, residents were informed of these by text messages sent by the authorities which spread a wave of panic.

People began swamping the hospitals, reporting even mosquito bites as needle attacks. The Hans came out on the streets, demanding more protection and the dismissal of the regional communist party chief who has had a free hand over the region for 15 years, and is, in fact, seen as a hardliner. Five people died in the skirmishes between the police and the Hans, and between the Hans and the Uighurs on that day. Finally, four persons were sentenced for the syringe attacks; two of them were drug addicts who had used a syringe to threaten a cab driver.

In Xinjiang, troops are everywhere, check-posts have increased, bags are checked in malls and city buses have marshals on them. More intolerable than that is the ban on the internet. Residents must travel to a city outside their province to access the internet. Most of those who do so are foreigners and businessmen, probably of Han origin. For the majority of Uighurs who travel outside their region, internet access is often denied simply because they are Uighurs.

Shut out

A university student, an Uighur, was told this in so many words by an internet café in another provincial capital: “Sorry, your ethnic group can’t use the internet.’’ He was also denied a room in the city’s hotels. When he called to check about room availability, he was told rooms were available. But when he turned up, he was told that no one from Xinjiang would be taken in on orders from the public security bureau. Ironically, the student also works as a photographer for the State-run CCTV. After three hours of being refused a room in various hotels, he insisted that the police come and inspect his documents. After much suspicion that his papers were fake, the police cleared him and he was able to get a room.

Forcing himself to stay calm, the student rationalized his experience by blaming the provincial government. He knew Mandarin, but what if an ordinary Uighur from Xinjiang had to undergo this experience, he wondered. In fact, Uighurs are suspect wherever they travel — and that’s official policy. A notice on a hotel wall in a university district in Beijing asked hotel-owners to be doubly careful while checking the ID papers of all Uighur and Tibetan visitors and report them immediately to the local police station. The notice also gave phone numbers of local officials. Incidentally, in April this year, a Tibetan student had blogged about being turned away from hotels in Beijing.

The photographer’s story didn’t end with venting his anger on his blog, which was immediately picked up across the world. Hours later, he took the post off and replaced it with one that spoke of his displeasure that his original post had been used by people overseas. “We are all a big family of the motherland,” he asserted.
Top

Unregistered
12-11-09, 02:32
“We are all a big family of the motherland,” That is fake (not from the heart) and wrong conclusion. Han chinese is a big family. Tibet and Uyghur do not belong to their family but their ememy in that country! One broken into somebody's house and claim all people belong to one new family. The poor student have no choice and repeated the Chinese government's propaganda 'we are all in a big family of the motherland', trying to get the mercy from the superior Chinese ruler in that family. He must felt shameful and desperate.

In Chinese view, Uyghur and Tibetan are 'wang guo nu', which means slaves that their country was occupied . So, Uyghur and Tibet, have to accept the political abuse and the Chinese standard 'human rights' that have granded to them , because 'I (chinese) have successfuly broken into and occupied your house, so, from now on I am in charge!' 'Now, almost all the world have accepted my legal status as your boss in this new 60 years big house, eventhough that big house consists of many occupied smaller houses. You awkward second class war-losers barbaric ' minority' races dare to ask some political, econimic or cultural rights? Count you bless, keep you mouth shut for rights and only say thanks for what I have given to you. You have to accept my statement that I had rescured you from your old country. Otherwise, I will give you my billion Han peoples, let them answere if we should give you some rights or not!'.

The Chinese government told the world and sometime with 'tears' in their eyes: 'please don't hurt my billion 'Han' people's feeling! 'We are legaly occupied those lands.'' When the world support Uyghur and Tibetan's basic rights, they think that is hurting their feeling ,so have to denied. Because they believe they are the boss of Uyghur and Tibet, so, they should determine Uyghur and Tibetan's fate, not Uyghur and Tibetan themselves and not others. Others can only watch through a hemi-transluminate curtain how chinese hung those nations up with 'Chinese style' action and 'Chinese style' stories that they wrote to you to believe. The uyghur and Tibetan can only beg for their uncertain living, no rights please, 'slaves'.

I wish to add a word in the conclusion: ' We are all forced in a big family of mother land'. We will fight for all our rights including the right that refuse your bossing, stand up on our own feet, breathing all the free air and say anything true that we like and without fear!

A. Uighur



China Diary -Neha Sahay

They made headlines around the world, but the place most affected — Urumqi — learnt of the executions of nine persons for the July riots between the local Uighurs and the majority Han residents of the city by text messages on their mobiles. The messages were sent by the region’s information office.

Interestingly, the only mention of the executions in China’s official newspaper, the China Daily, was a small news item on Page Three titled “Execution news flies via text messages.” Neither the names of those executed nor the time or date of their execution was mentioned, either in the messages or in the news item.

The secrecy is indicative of the clampdown on information and communication in this Muslim-dominated province after the July riots. Since the disturbances, the distance between the Hans and the Uighurs seems to have grown, thanks largely to the mysterious syringe attacks that took place in September. Again, residents were informed of these by text messages sent by the authorities which spread a wave of panic.

People began swamping the hospitals, reporting even mosquito bites as needle attacks. The Hans came out on the streets, demanding more protection and the dismissal of the regional communist party chief who has had a free hand over the region for 15 years, and is, in fact, seen as a hardliner. Five people died in the skirmishes between the police and the Hans, and between the Hans and the Uighurs on that day. Finally, four persons were sentenced for the syringe attacks; two of them were drug addicts who had used a syringe to threaten a cab driver.

In Xinjiang, troops are everywhere, check-posts have increased, bags are checked in malls and city buses have marshals on them. More intolerable than that is the ban on the internet. Residents must travel to a city outside their province to access the internet. Most of those who do so are foreigners and businessmen, probably of Han origin. For the majority of Uighurs who travel outside their region, internet access is often denied simply because they are Uighurs.

Shut out

A university student, an Uighur, was told this in so many words by an internet café in another provincial capital: “Sorry, your ethnic group can’t use the internet.’’ He was also denied a room in the city’s hotels. When he called to check about room availability, he was told rooms were available. But when he turned up, he was told that no one from Xinjiang would be taken in on orders from the public security bureau. Ironically, the student also works as a photographer for the State-run CCTV. After three hours of being refused a room in various hotels, he insisted that the police come and inspect his documents. After much suspicion that his papers were fake, the police cleared him and he was able to get a room.

Forcing himself to stay calm, the student rationalized his experience by blaming the provincial government. He knew Mandarin, but what if an ordinary Uighur from Xinjiang had to undergo this experience, he wondered. In fact, Uighurs are suspect wherever they travel — and that’s official policy. A notice on a hotel wall in a university district in Beijing asked hotel-owners to be doubly careful while checking the ID papers of all Uighur and Tibetan visitors and report them immediately to the local police station. The notice also gave phone numbers of local officials. Incidentally, in April this year, a Tibetan student had blogged about being turned away from hotels in Beijing.

The photographer’s story didn’t end with venting his anger on his blog, which was immediately picked up across the world. Hours later, he took the post off and replaced it with one that spoke of his displeasure that his original post had been used by people overseas. “We are all a big family of the motherland,” he asserted.
Top

Unregistered
12-11-09, 12:16
When you are strong enough, break into other's house will be no problem. That is the world.
If terrorist is strong enough, they might occupy one country like chinese did before and become legal. That is the world, that happened before and happening now and will happen in the future. Dealing with west, human right is an issue. When dealing with east, no issue will be considered but swep them out.


“We are all a big family of the motherland,” That is fake (not from the heart) and wrong conclusion. Han chinese is a big family. Tibet and Uyghur do not belong to their family but their ememy in that country! One broken into somebody's house and claim all people belong to one new family. The poor student have no choice and repeated the Chinese government's propaganda 'we are all in a big family of the motherland', trying to get the mercy from the superior Chinese ruler in that family. He must felt shameful and desperate.

In Chinese view, Uyghur and Tibetan are 'wang guo nu', which means slaves that their country was occupied . So, Uyghur and Tibet, have to accept the political abuse and the Chinese standard 'human rights' that have granded to them , because 'I (chinese) have successfuly broken into and occupied your house, so, from now on I am in charge!' 'Now, almost all the world have accepted my legal status as your boss in this new 60 years big house, eventhough that big house consists of many occupied smaller houses. You awkward second class war-losers barbaric ' minority' races dare to ask some political, econimic or cultural rights? Count you bless, keep you mouth shut for rights and only say thanks for what I have given to you. You have to accept my statement that I had rescured you from your old country. Otherwise, I will give you my billion Han peoples, let them answere if we should give you some rights or not!'.

The Chinese government told the world and sometime with 'tears' in their eyes: 'please don't hurt my billion 'Han' people's feeling! 'We are legaly occupied those lands.'' When the world support Uyghur and Tibetan's basic rights, they think that is hurting their feeling ,so have to denied. Because they believe they are the boss of Uyghur and Tibet, so, they should determine Uyghur and Tibetan's fate, not Uyghur and Tibetan themselves and not others. Others can only watch through a hemi-transluminate curtain how chinese hung those nations up with 'Chinese style' action and 'Chinese style' stories that they wrote to you to believe. The uyghur and Tibetan can only beg for their uncertain living, no rights please, 'slaves'.

I wish to add a word in the conclusion: ' We are all forced in a big family of mother land'. We will fight for all our rights including the right that refuse your bossing, stand up on our own feet, breathing all the free air and say anything true that we like and without fear!

A. Uighur