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Uyghur News
20-12-08, 20:11
German official moots accepting Guantánamo inmates

Published: 20 Dec 08 16:01 CET
Online: http://www.thelocal.de/national/20081220-16265.html

The German government has signalled it is willing to help US President-Elect Obama make good on his promise to close the controversial terrorist prison camp Guantánamo Bay by taking in inmates.

Günther Nooke, human rights envoy for the German government, told the Frankfurter Rundschau on Friday that Germany would work together with other European states to take in innocent inmates.

“Guantánamo is an American problem, but its closure should not be hindered because no-one knows where to put the prisoners,” Nooke told the paper.

Nooke is particularly interested in the plight of the 17 Uighurs held in Guantánamo. The Uighurs are a Muslim Turkic-speaking people native to central Asia, whose return to their home in China carries diplomatic baggage. China is opposed to the independence efforts of its small Uighur population and reacts irritably to western involvement in the question. Germany is one of the few European countries with an Uighur community.

According to Saturday's report in the Frankfurter Rundschau, the German government has already conducted behind-the-scenes negotiations on the acceptance of the Uighur Guantánamo inmates. There is no evidence of their involvement in terrorist activities, and some were apparently sold by the Taliban to the United States military as prisoners.

It is widely thought that Obama faces a legal headache on what to do with Guantánamo Bay. Human rights groups are calling on him to release all prisoners that cannot be tried in a public court. Defence Secretary Robert Gates, who is to keep his post under Obama's presidency, called for the dissolution of the camp two years ago, but has been more reserved since. Legal experts fear that it is doubtful that any inmates could receive a fair public trial.

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

http://www.thelocal.de/national/20081220-16265.html

Vancouver Canada
20-12-08, 20:49
German Hokumitige rexmet! German xelqige rexmet!

Turdi Ghoja
21-12-08, 12:20
From the recent developments, I have finally seen the light at the end of the tunnel for those 17 unfortunate Uyghurmen at Guantanamo. It seems they will be released as free men after all thanks to the perseverance of many courageous and righteous people in the United States and around the world, particularly their lawyers, human rights campaigners, and Uyghur organizations and individuals. As it turns out, Obama’s election as president is the best gift ever for the people languishing in despair at Guantanamo. His promise to find the thrown-away keys to the locked cells of Guantanamo seems to have unlocked the doors of European countries who had been resistant to open their doors until just a couple of days ago. Like all the Uyghurs around the world, I have deeply appreciated Portugal's initiative and offer of help in solving the plights of those 17 young Uyghur men.

Portugal is a great country with compassionate people and a free and prosperous society. However, there is no Uyghurs in that country. It would be better for the people at Guantanamo to be released into countries with sizable Uyghur communities such as US, Canada and Germany, because they need a lot of help from the Uyghur communities to put their shattered lives together. Without knowing the language and culture, it would be extremely difficult for them to adjust to the new life and integrate into the new societies. Uyghur communities will play a crucial bridging role helping them start a new life in a new land. I hope US authorities will take these into consideration when make a decision on their fate.

It may be too early to open the champain just yet, but I am convinced that the new year will bring a new start and new future for those 17 young men. I hope we, the Uyghurs in US, will be given a chance to open not just the champaign, but our arms.

Turdi

Unregistered
21-12-08, 15:08
German official moots accepting Guantánamo inmates

Published: 20 Dec 08 16:01 CET
Online: http://www.thelocal.de/national/20081220-16265.html

The German government has signalled it is willing to help US President-Elect Obama make good on his promise to close the controversial terrorist prison camp Guantánamo Bay by taking in inmates.

Günther Nooke, human rights envoy for the German government, told the Frankfurter Rundschau on Friday that Germany would work together with other European states to take in innocent inmates.

“Guantánamo is an American problem, but its closure should not be hindered because no-one knows where to put the prisoners,” Nooke told the pape

Nooke is particularly interested in the plight of the 17 Uighurs held in Guantánamo. The Uighurs are a Muslim Turkic-speaking people native to central Asia, whose return to their home in China carries diplomatic baggage. China is opposed to the independence efforts of its small Uighur population and reacts irritably to western involvement in the question. Germany is one of the few European countries with an Uighur community.

According to Saturday's report in the Frankfurter Rundschau, the German government has already conducted behind-the-scenes negotiations on the acceptance of the Uighur Guantánamo inmates. There is no evidence of their involvement in terrorist activities, and some were apparently sold by the Taliban to the United States military as prisoners.

It is widely thought that Obama faces a legal headache on what to do with Guantánamo Bay. Human rights groups are calling on him to release all prisoners that cannot be tried in a public court. Defence Secretary Robert Gates, who is to keep his post under Obama's presidency, called for the dissolution of the camp two years ago, but has been more reserved since. Legal experts fear that it is doubtful that any inmates could receive a fair public trial.

The Local (news@thelocal.de)

http://www.thelocal.de/national/20081220-16265.html




Mana bu germanche Hewer Adressi...

http://www.fr-online.de/in_und_ausland/politik/aktuell/1648744_Die-letzten-Tage-von-Guantanamo.html

Deutsche Welle
21-12-08, 16:06
Human Rights | 21.12.2008
German Official Urges Berlin to Accept Guantanamo Inmates

The human rights envoy for the German government has urged Berlin to help US President-Elect Obama meet his promise to close the controversial prison camp Guantanamo Bay by taking in innocent inmates.

In an interview with newspaper Frankfurter Rundschau published on Saturday, Dec 20, Guenter Nooke said Germany along with other European nations had to ensure that Guantanamo's planned closure went ahead as planned.

"Guantanamo is an American problem. But you can't allow its closure to fail because no-one knows where to put the prisoners," Nooke told the paper.

In particular, Germany should be prepared to take in some of the 17 Uighurs held at the prison camp in Cuba, Nooke said.

Germany urged to take in Uighur prisoners

A Muslim minority native to Central Asia, the Uighurs face political persecution in their homeland China, according to human rights groups. Their struggle for independence is strongly opposed by China. Germany has a small Uighur community, many of whom live in Munich.

The head of Amnesty International's Germany chapter, Barbara Lochbiler too urged the German government to lay particular emphasis on the Uighurs at Guantanamo -- there is no evidence of their involvement in terrorist activities -- while considering taking in prisoners.

"The Uighurs have a network in Germany. That's why it would be easier for them to start a new life here," Lochbiler told German news agency dpa.

Lochbiler said the German government together with other European Union nations should show its readiness to take in apparently innocent Guantanamo inmates. "Quick action is more than overdue," she said.

Guantanamo closure won't be easy

Earlier this week, a US defense official said the Pentagon is working on a plan to shut Guantanamo Bay that would be available to President-elect Barack Obama when he takes office on Jan. 20

Obama's decision to close the hugely controversial prison camp located at the US naval station in southeastern Cuba, has been welcomed by human rights groups and governments around the world. The prison has come to symbolize aggressive detention practices and has opened the United States to allegations of torture.

But it's largely accepted that shuttering the prison, set up by President Bush after the Sept 11 attack on New York and Washington, will be a tricky legal task. Many experts doubt whether any of the suspected Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters imprisoned there will receive a fair public trial.

The German government has long called for the prison's closure with Chancellor Angela Merkel repeatedly bringing it up in talks with President Bush.


One of the first prisoners brought to Guantanamo Bay in 2002 included a German-born Turkish national Murat Kurnaz. He was held in the camp until 2006 and claims to have been tortured. No trial was held.

The head of Germany's opposition Green Party, Claudia Roth, on Saturday urged Merkel "to convey to the US government that Germany was prepared to take in Guantanamo inmates."


http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,3892751,00.html